Referenser från forskning och facklitteratur om att läsa tidigt

Referenser från forskning och facklitteratur om att läsa tidigt

• "Shared book reading at 8-months was linked to later expressive language abilities of 12 and 16 months." (Karrass & Braungart-Rieker, 2006, Infant Toddler Specialitst of Indiana Network).

• När man läser för babyn hjälper det barnet att utveckla ett större och mer uttrycksfullt ordförråd vid två års ålder. (Raikes, H. Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development)

• "... relations between reading to children and children’s language and cognitive development begin very early". (Raikes, H. Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development)

• Reading for babies helps them develop larger, more expressive vocabulary at age 2. (Raikes, H. Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development)

• Early reading have toddlers at age 2 with better language comprehension. (Raikes, H. , Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development.)

• "In addition the more the mother read, the better the child’s vocabulary, which in turn encouraged more reading." (Raikes, H. , Child Development, July/August 2006; vol 7. News release, Society for Research in Child Development.) Les mer

• "It is never too early to introduce reading to a child. From they day they’re born, it will only enrich language development." (Susan Baxter, Early Childhood Education Instructor, El Camino Community College, quoted in Place of our Own: Reading to Infants).

• "Read to kids from infancy and up because it supports language development, listening skills, speaking skills and introduction to text." (Susan Baxter, Early Childhood Education Instructor, El Camino Community College, quoted in Place of our Own: Reading to Infants).

• "A baby may not understand what you’re reading, but the whole idea is about the relationship that’s established. It is the cuddling time and hearing the parent’s voice, the touch and feel and smell of the book, the exploration of what a book is and the introduction to language." (Susan Baxter, Early Childhood Education Instructor, El Camino Community College, quoted in Place of our Own: Reading to Infants).

• "Reading with infants and toddlers contributes to the development of language and prereading skills. But more important, it encourages the interaction of the early childhood professional and the child." (Elizabeth A. Hasson, ass. Professor, Dept. of Childhood Studies and Reading at West Chester University, quoted in Springer Link, 2005)

• "It is the environmental engineering and direct input from the parent that helps the neurological connections of infants who are later seen as smart, capable and competent." (William H. Staso, Ph.D, in Neural Foundations: What Stimulation Your Baby Needs to Become Smart. 1995"

• "The best time to start sharing books with children is during babyhood, even when they are as young as six weeks." (Starting Out Right: A Guide to Promoting Children's Reading Success published by the US National Research Council's Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children)

• "As caregivers you need to begin early, talking and reading with your babies before the age of two, while they are experiencing a critical period of brain growth and receptivity to language." (C.J.Blakemore & B.W.Ramirez, "Baby Read Aloud Basics, 2006 )

• "Shared book reading at 8-months was linked to later expressive language abilities of 12 and 16 months. (Karrass & Braungart-Rieker, 2006, Infant Toddler Specialitst of Indiana Network).

• "Joint attention, when the child is able to follow another’s gaze and share the experience of looking at an object or activity, provides the infant with consistent opportunities for learning." (Karrass & Braungart-Rieker, 2006, Infant Toddler Specialitst of Indiana Network).

• "It is the environmental engineering and direct input from the parent that helps the neurological connections of infants who are later seen as smart, capable and competent." (William H. Staso, Ph.D, in Neural Foundations: What Stimulation Your Baby Needs to Become Smart. 1995"

• "A lot of people won’t read to a child until six months, but if you don’t start from birth, you don’t know what you’re missing" (Ramirez, North County Times, 2006.)

• "If a child is old enough to talk to, it is old enough to be read to. It’s the same language." (Jim Trelease, The Read-Aloud Handbook, 2001, p. 28)

• "The baby learns how to use language through listening to how the parent speaks. Before 6 months of age, the baby can learn any language it is exposed to as it focuses on the rhythm of the language. After 8 months baby focus on the sounds of their own language (s) and loose the ability to hear and produce sounds in other languages. After one year of age, the brain specialises in the language it hears at home." (Golinkoff and Hirsh-Pasek, How Babies Talk, p.23)

• "Children who have not heard enough words in their first years of live lack the basic language building blocks necessary to learn how to read. Reading and writing skills begin at birth when baby is first exposed to language." (C.J.Blakemore & B.W.Ramirez, "Baby Read Aloud Basics, 2006)

• "Infants should be spoken to as if they understood every word you were saying. In the beginning months your baby will not understand the words you say- - but there is so much about your intonation patterns and the word sounds that you make that is important. Good foundations of language begin shortly after birth." (William Staso, PhD, "Neural Foundations, What Stimulates Your baby Needs to Become Smart).

• "Even at birth babies have shown preference for hearing stories that had been read to them before they were born. Given a choice between hearing their mothers read a new book or one they had heard repeatedly before birth, babies responded by increased sucking when they heard the familiar story they had been exposed to before birth." (Miriam Diamond and Janet Hopson, ‘Magic Trees of the Mind, 2000, p. 88).

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